Sunday, October 29 – DRAFT Schedule


Avian Wash Laboratory (Two identical sessions)

Avian

09:30 (210 minutes | Laboratory)
Pacific Wildlife Care

January Bill
Bird Ally X
Abstract: Laboratory Summary: Wildlife are exposed to many environmental contaminants, frequently caused by human activity, like uncovered oil pans, sticky glue traps, open grease bins and hanging fly traps in addition to oil spills. Once a bird becomes contaminated, their ability to fly and thermoregulate threatens their livelihood and survival. Knowing when and how to remove contaminates is essential for successfully rehabilitating your patient. Through hands-on practice we will teach principles of safely removing contaminants from feathers to help restore waterproofing and the ability to thermoregulate. During the lab we will we be working with recommended wash equipment and discuss how to meet facility requirements. We will cover pre-treatment methods, wash, rinse, and drying while demonstrating ways to reduce stress on your patient during each treatment.
Bio: Vann Masvidal, Marie Travers, Shannon Riggs, DVM, Monte Merrick, Laura Corsiglia & January O. Bill are cofounders of Bird Ally X(BAX). BAX is a small nonprofit organization dedicated to helping wild birds and the people who care for them. They have been working together for over 11 years, specializing in aquatic bird rehabilitation and contaminated wildlife. They are co-authors of An Introduction to Aquatic Bird Rehabilitation.

Vann Masvidal: BAX Co-founder, Pacific Wildlife Clinic Director & Volunteer Coordinator, CCWR Board of Directors President
Marie Travers: BAX Co-founder, Focus Wildlife, CCWR Publications Committee Member
Shannon Riggs: BAX Co-founder, Pacific Wildlife Care Director of Animal Care, Wildlife Veterinarian, CCWR Board of Directors Member at Large
Monte Merrick: BAX Co-Founder, Humboldt Wildlife Care Center Director,
Laura Corsiglia: BAX Co-founder, Visual Artist
January Bill: BAX Co-founder, CCWR Advocacy Committee Member

Wild Birds: Neurological Disorders

Avian

09:30 (50 minutes | Lecture)
Los Osos North/South

Dr. Michelle Hawkins
CA Raptor Center
Abstract: It is common for birds to present with neurological clinical signs, however it can be challenging to identify the cause. In this lecture we will cover:
a. When, why, and how to perform a neurologic exam.
b. Diagnostic testing
c. Specific disorders - trauma, infections, toxicities, metabolic diseases
Bio: Dr. Hawkins received her veterinary degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997 and completed a residency and fellowship in Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery at the University of California, Davis in 2001. She became board-certified in Avian Practice by the American Board of Veterinary Practice in 2002. After 2 years in private practice, she joined the faculty of the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine faculty. She is currently Professor of Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis and Director of the California Raptor Center. Her research focuses on anesthesia, analgesia and critical patient care for companion and wild birds.

Fox, Coyote, and Skunk, Oh My!

Mammalian

09:30 (80 minutes | Lecture)
Ballroom South

Ruth McDunn / Ashley Kinney
Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley
Abstract: Introduction to rehabilitation and release for foxes, coyotes, and skunks. This includes:
a. neonate identification
b. physical examination of young animals, juveniles, and adults
c. vaccination protocols
d. housing inside in kennels
e. outside enclosure suggestions
f. enrichment ideas
g. when/how to release
Bio: Ruth McDunn started volunteering at WCSV in August of 2011 and was quickly promoted to shift captain. She continues to volunteer 8-12 hours each week at the doing animal care, administration, and development assistance. In addition, Ruth has provided layout and formatting for the biannual newsletter, Tracks, since 2012. Ruth has worked with just about all types of animals that come in to the center, from baby birds, opossums, squirrels, raptors, and rabies vector species, and predatory mammals – of all ages – and even a few amphibians and reptiles. Ruth also releases animals to their habitat after rehabilitation, often photographing the process for online and print publications. Ruth is the current CCWR Board Vice President.

Ashley Kinney started volunteering at WCSV in April 2003 and hired as an Animal Care Assistant in 2006. Ashley now holds the title of Hospital Manager and oversees all aspects of the rehabilitation program, creates protocols and policies to improve the rehab program, trains new volunteers and teaches CDFW approved classes.

Habitat Gardening for our Wildlife

All Species

09:30 (80 minutes | Lecture)
Ballroom North/Center

Veronica Bowers / Rachel Avilla
Native Songbird Care and Conservation
Abstract: Habitat Gardening for Wildlife
What is more important than the patients in our care? Probably, what happens to our patients after our care. Wildlife rehabilitators are by profession, nature conservationists. Our natural instinct is to conserve and create better habitat for our patients. We often support and/or involved with organizations such as The Audubon Society, Nature Conservancy, American Bird Conservancy, National Wildlife Federation, etc. All of these have some focus on habitat conservation. We all understand the true importance of good wildlife habitat.

The truth is not all of us have a green thumb, or even have time or space to grow a garden. However if you do have any space and a little bit of time you will be amazed at what can be accomplished. The importance of your efforts can save as many lives outside as you could inside.

In this presentation we will give you some of the underlying structure of what makes a good wildlife habitat. We can provide you with some of the basics on how to get started. By using native plants and adding critical elements to your garden you can help feed, shelter and support our native wildlife species with very little effort. While there can be many different focuses to a habitat garden we will go in depth on how to best support our most vulnerable and sensitive species, native songbirds.
Bio: Veronica Bowers is the director and founder of Native Songbird Care and Conservation. Located in Sebastopol, California, NSCC is a state and federally permitted wildlife rehabilitation facility devoted exclusively to the care of native passerines. With support of a small team of 12 amazing volunteers, Native Songbird Care & Conservation cares for approximately 1,000 songbirds each year.

Veronica has a passion for songbirds and has been working exclusively with this diverse and challenging group of wildlife since 1999. In addition to the hands-on care of the birds, Veronica is responsible for managing the day-to-day center operations, including recruitment, training and management of volunteers; raising funds to cover hospital operating costs; and responding to approximately 3,500 calls annually from the public.

Veronica teaches songbird rehabilitation workshops and species-specific classes to rehabilitators throughout North America; presents educational outreach programs to community groups in California; and serves on the California Council of Wildlife Rehabilitators board of directors and CCWR Advocacy Committee

Rachel Avilla started her wildlife career in 2002 at Bird Rescue Center in Santa Rosa, California. The following year 2003, she joined Lindsay Wildlife Museum’s program in Walnut Creek, CA where she started as an intern, became a supervisor and then a manager. She managed around 350 volunteers for over 6 years. In 2013 She left Lindsay and began working with Belize Bird Rescue where she rehabilitated parrots and other neotropical birds. She is a co-founder of the non-profit 501(c)3 The Wild Neighbors Database Project and manages customer support for WRMD. Currently she is volunteering for Native Songbird Care and Conservation in Sebastopol California.

Rachel has always had a strong interest in plants, wildlife and the ecosystems that encompass them. She has spent some time learning and implementing wildlife friendly habitats with a focus on using native California plants with an edible to human landscapes. She has been trying to find the balance between existing as a human and supporting nature as much as possible.

Chlamydial Infections in Raptors in Rehabilitation

Avian

10:20 (30 minutes | Lecture)
Los Osos North/South

Dr. Michelle Hawkins
CA Raptor Center
Abstract: The goals of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of Chlamydial infections in 5 CA rehabilitation centers. Results from various testing, including while genome sequencing of two culture isolates, will be presented.
Bio: Dr. Hawkins received her veterinary degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997 and completed a residency and fellowship in Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery at the University of California, Davis in 2001. She became board-certified in Avian Practice by the American Board of Veterinary Practice in 2002. After 2 years in private practice, she joined the faculty of the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine faculty. She is currently Professor of Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis and Director of the California Raptor Center. Her research focuses on anesthesia, analgesia and critical patient care for companion and wild birds.

CDFW Update for Wildlife Rehabilitators

All Species

11:00 (30 minutes | Lecture)
Ballroom North/Center

Nicole Carion
California Department of Fish and Wildlife
Abstract: General statewide update on wildlife rehabilitation.
Bio: California Department of Fish and Wildlife's statewide wildlife rehabilitation coordinator.

Avian Physical Exam Lab Lecture

Avian

11:30 (50 minutes | Lab Lecture)
Los Osos North/South

Dr. Rebecca Duerr
International Bird Rescue
Abstract: Note: Attending this lecture is a prerequisite to participate in the paid laboratory session. All registrants are welcome to attend the lecture.
Lecture Summary: As mammals we all largely understand quite a bit about mammalian anatomy. But birds are another beast entirely! Drastically different and variable anatomy coupled with often small body sizes can make our fingers feel like sausages and make it very confusing to figure out what is wrong with an injured bird. In this lecture and lab we will show you how to do an effective avian physical exam, and identify all the parts while assessing what is and is not normal. Correctly identifying abnormalities is a crucial step in the treatment of all birds that come into care. Lab students will have ample opportunities to perform physical examinations of various species of birds (carcasses).
Bio: Dr. Rebecca Duerr is the Veterinarian and Research Director at International Bird Rescue's two wildlife clinics in California. She completed her DVM, MPVM, and PhD degrees at University of California Davis, with the care of oiled seabirds as the subject of both graduate degrees. She is currently working on the second edition of Hand-Rearing Birds, recently wrote and co-edited NWRA's Topics in Wildlife Medicine, Vol. 4: Orthopedics, co-wrote the wild orphans section of Merck Veterinary Manual, and just finished Seabird Medicine and Orphan Care chapters for the upcoming book Medical Management of Wildlife Species: A Guide for Practitioners. She serves on the Board of Directors of the National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association and is a frequent lecturer at UC Davis on avian physiology and pediatrics.

Effective Enclosure Enrichment

General Information

11:30 (50 minutes | Lecture)
Ballroom South

Katlyn Wolzen
Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue
Abstract: While many ideas for enclosure enrichment exist, which ones work? We've tried different kinds at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue with varying degrees of success. We'll go over the basics of enclosure enrichment, show examples of some of our favorite enrichment items, and explain how we make enrichment happen at a busy wildlife rescue. We want to share the techniques that have been the most effective and well-liked for a variety of species. What interests a squirrel is not the same as a coyote, but enrichment for each animal is possible. We'll show you how.
Bio: Katlyn is an Animal Care Assistant at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue. She graduated Sonoma State University with a B.A. in Zoology in May 2016,entered our Summer 2016 intern program and joined the staff in the fall. She is the Enrichment Coordinator, which means she ensures that education animals and animals temporarily held for rehabilitation have enclosure enrichment to improve their quality of life.

WRMD: Best Practices for Best Results

General Information

11:30 (50 minutes | Lecture)
Ballroom North/Center

Devin Dombrowski
WRMD
Abstract: Wildlife Rehabilitation MD or WRMD for short has become a very useful tool throughout the wildlife rehabilitation community. California is especially important due to the wonderful networking amongst our state, interactive support from our State Department and our unique location.

In 2016 WRMD launched a Pilot program with help from the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the UC Davis Wildlife Health Center to survey what is affecting California's wildlife in real time. This program has been invaluable to the state and to our community.

This discussion will cover some of the hot topics that have been uncovered using the program and how best to record your data so that your organization can better contribute to the collective whole. We will also discuss where and how this information could be used in the future.
Bio: Devin Dombrowski has been a wildlife rehabilitator since 2003, working and volunteering at many organizations, including Lindsay Wildlife Museum, International Bird Rescuer, Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, OWCN and Native Songbird Care and Conservation.

In the past few years WRMD has been a huge success within the wildlife rehabilitation community. It has on going projects with the State of California and the Oiled Wildlife Care Network. He has learned a lot by collaborating with so many groups and continues to try and provide the best support he can to the wildlife rehabilitation community.

Avian Wash Laboratory (Session #2)

Avian

13:30 (210 minutes | Laboratory)
Pacific Wildlife Care

January Bill
Bird Ally X
Abstract: Laboratory Summary: Wildlife are exposed to many environmental contaminants, frequently caused by human activity, like uncovered oil pans, sticky glue traps, open grease bins and hanging fly traps in addition to oil spills. Once a bird becomes contaminated, their ability to fly and thermoregulate threatens their livelihood and survival. Knowing when and how to remove contaminates is essential for successfully rehabilitating your patient. Through hands-on practice we will teach principles of safely removing contaminants from feathers to help restore waterproofing and the ability to thermoregulate. During the lab we will we be working with recommended wash equipment and discuss how to meet facility requirements. We will cover pre-treatment methods, wash, rinse, and drying while demonstrating ways to reduce stress on your patient during each treatment.
Bio: Vann Masvidal, Marie Travers, Shannon Riggs, DVM, Monte Merrick, Laura Corsiglia & January O. Bill are cofounders of Bird Ally X(BAX). BAX is a small nonprofit organization dedicated to helping wild birds and the people who care for them. They have been working together for over 11 years, specializing in aquatic bird rehabilitation and contaminated wildlife. They are co-authors of An Introduction to Aquatic Bird Rehabilitation.

Vann Masvidal: BAX Co-founder, Pacific Wildlife Clinic Director & Volunteer Coordinator, CCWR Board of Directors President
Marie Travers: BAX Co-founder, Focus Wildlife, CCWR Publications Committee Member
Shannon Riggs: BAX Co-founder, Pacific Wildlife Care Director of Animal Care, Wildlife Veterinarian, CCWR Board of Directors Member At Large
Monte Merrick: BAX Co-Founder, Humboldt Wildlife Care Center Director,
Laura Corsiglia: BAX Co-founder, Visual Artist
January Bill: BAX Co-founder, CCWR Advocacy Committee Member

Avian Physical Exam Laboratory

Avian

13:30 (180 minutes | Laboratory)
Edna

Rebecca Duerr
International Bird Rescue
Abstract: See lecture notes above.
Bio: See lecture notes above.

Wordpress Websites for Wildlife Rehabilitators

General Information

13:30 (80 minutes | Lecture)
Los Osos North/South

Jeanette Stone
Pacific Wildlife Care
Abstract: WordPress is not just a blogging platform. It has evolved through out the years into a versatile website content management system (CMS). It is easy to install, create webpages and is totally responsive (works on phones and tablets). This presentation gives you the information you need to get your wordpress website started! And oh yeah, it is also fun!
Bio: Jeanette served as the Center Operations Director for Pacific Wildlife Care in Morro Bay, CA. (2009-2013) She has volunteered with PWC for 10 years in different capacities; as a center worker, website & graphic designer, board vice-president and president. Visit www.pacificwildlifecare.org

Rodenticide Exposure In California Wildlife

All Species

13:30 (50 minutes | Lecture)
Ballroom North/Center

Stella McMillin
California Department of Fish and Wildlife
Abstract: The California Department of Fish and Wildlife investigates cases of pesticide exposure and intoxication in wildlife. In California the majority of scavenging and predatory wildlife tested has been exposed to anticoagulant rodenticides, likely through secondary exposure. Most cases involve second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides, which are only available to certified applicators in California. Diagnosis of anticoagulant rodenticide intoxication requires evidence of coagulopathy, in addition to detection of anticoagulant residues in the appropriate tissues. Incidents of wildlife intoxication from bromethalin, an acute rodenticide, are increasing. Bromethalin is a neurotoxicant registered primarily for use on commensal rodents. In contrast with the anticoagulant rodenticides, exposure to bromethalin appears to be caused primarily by ingestion of the bait itself. The most commonly exposed species are striped skunks and raccoons. Diagnosis of bromethalin intoxication typically occurs after the animal show characteristic neurological symptoms such as muscle tremors, seizures, and paralysis of the rear limbs; and bromethalin is detected in the brain or adipose tissue. Cases of intoxication by the acute rodenticides strychnine and zinc phosphide are less common and appear to result from misuse of the products. Trends in wildlife/pesticide incidents and possible mitigation measures will be discussed. Reliance on chemical control of vertebrate pests, without including other elements of Integrated Pest Management, such as exclusion and sanitation, leads to widespread exposure in non-target wildlife and is an ineffective long-term strategy.
Bio: Stella McMillin is a senior environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife Wildlife Investigations Laboratory. She has worked for the department for 20 years and has statewide responsibility for investigating impacts of pesticides on wildlife.

Best Practices in Rehab Animal Welfare

Mammalian

13:30 (80 minutes | Workshop (Interactive))
Ballroom South

Bob Cisneros
Big Bear Alpine Zoo
Abstract: Big Bear Alpine Zoo utilizes the "Five Freedoms" and "Five Opportunities to Thrive" in order to promote best practices in animal welfare when rehabilitating wildlife, including enrichment, quality of life, and holding design. These practices ensure that optimal and objective care is maintained while providing temporary care for wildlife. Understanding our role in promoting animal welfare allows for evidence-based animal care management to provide consistency in our rehab programs.
Bio: Bob Cisneros has been the Curator and General Manager of Big Bear Alpine zoo since March 2015. His previous experience includes over 22 years at San Diego Zoo as a Hospital Keeper, Animal Care Supervisor of carnivores, hoofstock, shipping pens,and Children's Zoo. He was also President of the American Association of Zoo Keepers, served on the Board of Directors at the California Wolf Center, and a member of AZA's Professional Development Committee. He currently serves on AZA's Institutional Data Management Advisory Committee.

Tips on Marketing your Small Nonprofit

General Information

15:00 (50 minutes | Lecture)
Los Osos North/South

Susan Pfau
Abstract: Tips on how to market your small nonprofit using low budget/no budget strategies. Examples include understanding your target audience and how to reach them, how to utilize free marketing resources, creating and using social media to build brand awareness, etc.
Bio: Volunteered/interned/worked for four years at the Lindsay Wildlife Experience's Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital. Also have more than 20 years of combined experience in marketing/communications in both corporate and nonprofit environments. Nonprofit work includes donor and volunteer relations, corporate relations, development and communications.

Orphan Opossum Care Made Easy

Mammalian

15:00 (50 minutes | Lecture)
Ballroom South

Leslie Bale
Opossum Society of the United States
Abstract: The presentation will cover the intake exam on opossums, housing orphan babies, weaning and the final steps until release.
Bio: Leslie Bale has been rehabilitating opossums exclusively for over 30 years. She has been a member of CCWR for 22 years, along with NWRA and IWRC and has presented on opossums for each of these organizations. Leslie has no medical background but has been using homeopathics for several years.

Getting It Out There: Engaging Social Media

General Information

16:00 (50 minutes | Lecture)
Los Osos North/South

Amber Engle
Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Abstract: The best way to reach the broadest audience in the current culture is to use the many social media platforms available, but variety and rapidly changing trends can be daunting. You need to keep your posts fresh and engaging. This lecture will cover:
a. Types of posts that will serve your message.
b. How to assess whether a new platform will work for you.
c. How to post across multiple platforms.
d. How to get information to your local populace without being a nag.
e. Keeping it within your MOU.
f. How to make it relevant. That awesome fact or unusual bird that you love might not be the kind of thing that plays to a larger audience.
g. Keeping up even during baby season.
Bio: Amber Engle started in wildlife population conservation, but found her interests better served doing wildlife rehabilitation while in Washington State. Now in California, Amber is currently the Wildlife Rehabilitation Manager at Lindsay Wildlife Experience. Coming from a background in molecular and wildlife biology, she learned the importance of social media working in the alcohol industry, and in wildlife rehabilitation, has found how those same principles of public engagement apply. Her experiences also draw from animal behavior research and wildlife monitoring for the state to inform conservation messaging.