Print Saturday Agenda

2017 Symposium Agenda – Saturday

8:00 AM
Los Osos
 
Easy Yoga
The classes offered this weekend will be of mixed styles and gentle in flow. They are intended for people all levels of ability and experience. Please come ready to relax, rejuvenate and prepare for a great day of learning and sharing with your fellow CCWR'ers.
Elaine Ibarra
Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network
Elaine became a student of yoga in 1993 and began teaching in 1999. She has studied and enjoyed many different styles of yoga. Her preferred type in her private practice is Iyengar Yoga.
9:00 AM
Ballroom North/Center
 
CCWR General Meeting
Vann Masvidal
CCWR
Vann Masvidal is the current CCWR Board President.
9:30 AM
Ballroom North/Center
Mammalian Keynote Speaker
A Future for California's Mountain Lions
Though mountain lion rehabilitation is currently the responsibility of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the presence of mountain lions on the landscape is relevant to all wildlife professionals. California mountain lion law and policy is changing, as is the population vitality and status of lions in the state. Learn about some experiments with reintroduction into the wild, how mountain lions fare in captivity, and how the age and sex of lions plays into captive success. And take a look at recent trends and challenges to relocating lions in the wild. As threats to lions increase, people are finding new ways to coexist, and rehabilitators can help spread the word. The Mountain Lion Foundation brings 35 years of experience to the task of securing a brighter future for this invaluable apex predator.
Lynn Cullens
Mountain Lion Foundation
Lynn Cullens has been working with the Mountain Lion Foundation since 1989 when she volunteered during the Proposition 117 Campaign to end trophy hunting of lions in California. As Executive Director, she leads the organization's fight to end trophy hunting in 14 states and to reduce the number of mountain lions killed as a result of depredation, poisons, traffic, poaching and habitat loss.
10:30 AM
Ballroom North/Center
All Species Lecture
Poison Free Malibu/Raptors Are The Solution
Is rat poison our new DDT? Rat poison has infiltrated the wildlife food web and is causing widespread mortality of predator wildlife, as well as sub-lethal impacts. This presentation will discuss the impacts as well as Poison Free Malibu and Raptors are the Solution's efforts to educate the general public, including talks, fairs, billboard and public transit campaigns, and our new chapters in San Luis Obispo and Santa Cruz. We will discuss state legislation introduced this year to ban rat poison, efforts to ban rodenticides in the Coastal Zone and how we hope to move forward. PFM and RATS have worked with 26 cities to pass anti-rodenticide resolutions. We will also discuss other efforts we are engaged in to try to remove these poisons from the food web, including working with cities, businesses, homeowners associations and schools
Joel Schulman
Poison Free Malibu
Joel Schulman is co-founder of Poison Free Malibu. Poison Free Malibu has been working since 2012 to educate people about the dangers to predators from the widespread use of rat poison and about the ecological role the predators play in controlling rodents. PFM started in the Santa Monica Mountains of southern California where 90% of mountain lions, bobcats, coyotes, raptors and other carnivores have been found to have poison in their systems due to the proximity with urban centers. PFM works jointly with Raptors are the Solution on these issues.
10:30 AM
Edna
Mammalian Workshop
Rodent Identification: Clues and Methodology
Can you tell a western harvest mouse from a saltmarsh harvest mouse? That is a difficult call at first glance. The rodent diversity of California is greater than most people realize. There are over 30 species and subspecies of rodents which are federally listed species or Species of Special Concern in California. More precise identification will increase your ability to offer the best possible diet and improve your reporting practices. Use dichotomous keys and learn research measurements to better distinguish your species of mouse, rat, or other rodent. Practice will occur on both live and non-living specimens.
Amber Engle
Lindsay Wildlife Museum
Amber Engle started in wildlife conservation doing population surveys on saltmarsh harvest mice with California Fish and Wildlife, but found her interests better served doing wildlife rehabilitation while in Washington State. Now back in California, Amber is currently the Wildlife Rehabilitation Manager at Lindsay Wildlife Experience. Coming from a background in molecular and wildlife biology, she seeks to improve understanding of animal community diversity and increased monitoring to better serve conservation.
10:30 AM
Los Osos North/South
All Species Lab Lecture
Parasitology - Lab Lecture
Note: Attending this lecture is a prerequisite to attend the paid Parasitology Laboratory. All registrants are welcome to the lecture.
Parasitism is a common finding in wild animals. Recognizing this problem in our patients can improve the level of care we provide. The Parasitology lecture will describe common parasites found in our wild patients, clinical signs, how to identify them, and how to treat them.
Dr. Shannon Riggs
Pacific Wildlife Care
Shannon Riggs received her DVM from UC Davis in 2002. This was followed by an internship in Bird/Zoo/Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery at Louisiana State University and a residency in Companion Avian/Pet Exotic Medicine and Surgery at UC Davis. From 2006-2009, she acted as the clinical veterinarian for the San Francisco Bay Oiled Wildlife Care and Education Center and was the response veterinarian for the Cosco Busan oil spill in the San Francisco Bay in 2007. In 2009, Shannon co-founded the wildlife rehabilitation and education group BirdAllyX and remains a member of its board of directors. From 2010-2012, she was the Associate Veterinarian and, subsequently, Director of Veterinary Services at Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek. Shannon is currently the Director of Animal Care for Pacific Wildlife Care in Morro Bay.
10:30 AM
Ballroom South
Mammalian Lecture
Orphan Opossum Care Made Easy
The presentation will cover the intake exam on opossums, housing orphan babies, weaning and the final steps until release.
Leslie Bale
Opossum Society of the United States
Leslie Bale has been rehabilitating opossums exclusively for over 30 years. She has been a member of CCWR for 22 years, along with NWRA and IWRC and has presented on opossums for each of these organizations. Leslie has no medical background but has been using homeopathics for several years.
11:30 AM
Ballroom North/Center
Mammalian Lecture
The Return of Wild Wolves
In our nation's past, wild wolves were brought to near extinction through government run anti-predator campaigns. Today, California Wolf Center is working to forge a visionary path for wolf recovery in both the Golden State and the Southwest; one built on trust and collaboration with those sharing the landscape with wild wolves. Come learn more about the plight of gray wolves, their ecological importance as a keystone predator and the unprecedented efforts of the California Wolf Center to achieve successful wild wolf recovery.
John Murtaugh
California Wolf Center
John Murtaugh is originally from Nevada and went to college at UNLV where he earned his Bachelor's in Film Studies. Wanting to eventually fulfill his childhood dream of working for wolf recovery, he decided to transition careers towards wildlife and began volunteering with Wildtracks - a wildlife conservation organization in Belize - in their primate rehabilitation center. He joined the California Wolf Center team as an intern in 2014 and was hired as the Program Coordinator in 2015. He leads all educational efforts of the organization helping to make the mission of wolf recovery in the wild a reality.
11:30 AM
Ballroom South
Avian Lecture
Effects of Dextrose on Survival of Cold Seabirds
During this study, over 75% of cold seabirds were hypoglycemic during admit examination. When birds were gavaged with warm water, no hypoglycemic individuals survived until the next morning (~ 90% died within 90 minutes). When hypoglycemic birds were gavaged with 5% dextrose, ~90% survived until the next morning. The addition of 5% dextrose to gavage fluids resulted in a mean increase in core body temperature (CBT) of over 1 deg F. Given the profound difference in survival of hypoglycemic seabirds receiving 5% dextrose gavage and the lack of any observable negative effects, gavaging debilitated, hypothermic seabirds with 5% dextrose is likely to result in more birds surviving than using tap water. This talk will also discuss why resuscitation fluids for cold seabirds should be 110-115 deg F and why rehabbers need to measure gavage temperatures.
Dr. Nancy Anderson
Oiled Wildlife Care Network
Nancy received her bachelors of science and engineering, veterinary degree, and doctorate from Ohio State University. After completing her veterinary degree, she worked as a private practitioner and then joined the faculty at OSU College of Veterinary Medicine. For her doctoral research in ecophysiology, she studied energetics and thermoregulation in brown treesnakes. She came to California in 2000, where she served as the Director of Wildlife Services for Lindsay Wildlife Experience and then became a staff veterinarian at Six Flags Discovery Kingdom in 2010. Nancy joined the OWCN team in 2011. During spill response she coordinates Field Care & Processing and often serves as the Field Stabilization Lead.
11:30 AM
Los Osos North/South
Avian Lecture
The Importance of Light in Wildlife Rehabilitation
Light plays an important role in avian physiology, including development, nutrition, and vision. In this discussion, we will briefly review basic avian anatomy and physiology pertinent to light and the physics of light. We will then build upon these topics to extrapolate the importance of proper lighting for passerines in the rehabilitation environment.
Dr. Tomo Wiggans
Contra Costa Animal Eye Care
Dr. Wiggans became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology in 2015. He spent 4 years volunteering at the Lindsay Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital prior to entering veterinary school at the University of California, Davis. During his ophthalmology residency, he examined and performed ophthalmic surgery on numerous wild and captive exotic species, including patients at the Micke Grove and Sacramento Zoos and the California Department of Fish and Game. He currently practices in the Pleasant Hill area at Contra Costa Animal Eye Care.
1:30 PM
Ballroom North/Center
General Information Lecture
Barn Owl Maintenance Program
The Barn Owl Maintenance Program was developed by Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue in order to provide needed gopher control services to our community, encourage barn owl habitat, and raise funds for our raptor rehabilitation work. We assist vineyard and home owners who have gopher problems by offering a natural, organic, integrated pest management solution. We consult with the landowners to find the best places to put barn owl boxes to entice barn owls to the property and install the boxes. Once the boxes are up, we do research in the spring to determine where the nesting pairs are located. That way, when the wildlife rescue receives orphaned barn owls, we can place them with wild foster parents in barn owl boxes. In fall, we clean and maintain the barn owl boxes to encourage continual use of the boxes. In this way, we believe we can help alleviate gopher problems through ongoing barn owl presence in our clients' homes and vineyards. The funds raised from the fees for these services support our Raptor Recovery Center.
Michelle Fowler
Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue
Michelle, Education Ourtreach Director, is an artist, an animal lover, and passionate about education. She received her BA in Psychology from Sonoma State and is currently working on her Master’s in the subject. Before SCWR, Michelle worked in the Rohnert Park School District Special Education Program as an Instructional Assistant and in her free time she would create chalk art with her mother.

With her passion for both education and animals, SCWR was a perfect fit. She loved that the Education Outreach Position combined her skills and opened a door for her to practice environmental education and curriculum planning. She also loved that the position is so connected with the public and that the money that she raises with event planning and fundraising always goes to a good cause.

Michelle’s goals for the position are to spread more awareness about wildlife friendly techniques through our Predator Exclusion Education Program, and to expand all programs beyond what limited staffing was able to support in the past.
1:30 PM
Ballroom South
Avian Lecture
UCD Hummingbird Health Program: The Ins and Outs
The UC Davis Hummingbird Health and Conservation Program focuses on protecting hummingbirds by combining scientific research with outreach and education awareness. Core components include hummingbird health and population monitoring research such as hummingbird banding, hummingbird tracking, and general disease related studies. Practices in place include safe and humane hummingbird capture and sampling techniques directed by a federally permitted master bander.
Dr. Lisa Tell
UC Davis
Lisa Tell, DVM is the Director of the UC Davis Hummingbird Health and Conservation Program and is a Master Bander for hummingbirds. She has been a full-time faculty member with the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine since 1997, and has been working with birds for the past 30 years.
1:30 PM
Edna
All Species Laboratory
Parasitology - Laboratory
Preregistration and payment required to attend the lab.

The laboratory session will focus on hands-on techniques and identification of parasites. Participants are encouraged to bring along any samples that they may be curious about.
Dr. Shannon Riggs
Pacific Wildlife Care
Shannon Riggs received her DVM from UC Davis in 2002. This was followed by an internship in Bird/Zoo/Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery at Louisiana State University and a residency in Companion Avian/Pet Exotic Medicine and Surgery at UC Davis. From 2006-2009, she acted as the clinical veterinarian for the San Francisco Bay Oiled Wildlife Care and Education Center and was the response veterinarian for the Cosco Busan oil spill in the San Francisco Bay in 2007. In 2009, Shannon co-founded the wildlife rehabilitation and education group BirdAllyX and remains a member of its board of directors. From 2010-2012, she was the Associate Veterinarian and, subsequently, Director of Veterinary Services at Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek. Shannon is currently the Director of Animal Care for Pacific Wildlife Care in Morro Bay.
1:30 PM
Los Osos North/South
Avian Lecture
Ethics & Stress in Wildlife Rehabilitation
This presentation discusses the ethical principles that govern wildlife rehabilitation to help guide us into making the best choices for our patients. We focus on the psychological and physiological impacts of stress and how this knowledge should inform and drive our treatment decisions. Considerations for patient euthanasia, treatment, release and permanent placement will be discussed with the objective of providing a foundation for making thoughtful life decisions for our patients.
Marie Travers & January Bill
Bird Ally X
January O. Bill & Marie Travers are Co-Directors at Bird Ally X
2:30 PM
Ballroom North/Center
Avian Lecture
Predator Exclusion Education Program
The Predator Exclusion Education Program is an innovative program at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue where we demonstrate proven predator exclusion and predation prevention techniques in order to protect domestic animals and livestock from wildlife. With these methods we can help prevent retaliation against wildlife predators. The PEEP program is a living laboratory which currently includes a demonstration area with a catio, barn, chicken coop, night corral and predator deterrents. In addition, the PEEP program provides an opportunity for youth volunteers to learn important animal husbandry and life skills that will prepare them for future wildlife rehabilitation work and cultivate a passion for animal welfare.
Linnaea Furlong
Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue
Linnaea Furlong is the Volunteer and Community Support Coordinator at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue. This means she manages volunteers and assists the wildlife rescue community with everything from animal care to exclusion. In her three years with Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue she has assisted with the development and implementation of the Predator Exclusion Education Program. She is excited to share how this pioneering program is focusing on the next generation to teach animal husbandry, gardening, and life skills and spread the word on how people, predators, and domestic animals can coexist with the right techniques.
2:30 PM
Ballroom South
All Species Lecture
Rehabbers Unite!
We are each others best resource! Whether we have questions about a species we have never had in care, or are struggling with the care of a specific individual who is not recovering well; there is no one more qualified to help AND truly understand the struggle than another rehabber. Generate new contacts and make new friends in our community!
Elaine Ibarra
Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network
Elaine Ibarra is the Animal Care Coordinator at the Santa Barbara Wildlife. She has been a volunteer with several other wildlife rehabilitation organizations and is a trained oil spill responder.
2:30 PM
Los Osos North/South
Mammalian Lecture
Reducing Stress with DIY Induction Chamber
Restraint of animals during medical procedures promotes undue stress which can prolong anesthetic induction. Big Bear Alpine Zoo converted two dog "Veri Kennels" into induction chambers using materials found at our local hardware store. Animals were placed in the crates minimizing the amount of restraint time, resulting in quick induction and minimal stress as well as a reduction in risk of injury to the handler. Our induction crates have been successfully used for exams on raccoons, foxes, ringtails, skunks, and bobcats.
Bob Cisneros
Big Bear Alpine Zoo
Bob Cisneros has been the Curator and General Manager of Big Bear Alpine zoo since March 2015. His previous
experience includes over 22 years at San Diego Zoo as a Hospital Keeper, Animal Care Supervisor of carnivores,
hoofstock, shipping pens,and Children's Zoo. He was also President of the American Association of Zoo Keepers, served on the Board of Directors at the California Wolf Center, and a member of AZA's Professional Development Committee.
He currently serves on AZA's Institutional Data Management Advisory Committee.
3:30 PM
Ballroom North/Center
Mammalian Lecture
Coyotes: Keeping the Peace
Once found mainly in wild and rural landscapes, coyotes have recently become a familiar presence in most urban areas as well. Unfortunately, archaic, anti-predator biases and fear mongering by the media have led to coyotes becoming one of the most persecuted animals in North America.
This presentation will replace common myths about coyotes with facts, and provide rehabbers with tools and tips they can share with the public to help prevent human/coyote conflicts from occurring in the first place.
Keli Hendricks
Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue
Keli studied animal science at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and enjoyed a successful career as a professional horse trainer until her retirement in 2012.
She now volunteers with Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, working in the hospital and fostering orphaned wildlife.
In addition, Keli serves as the Ranching with Wildlife Coordinator for Project Coyote where she provides outreach to ranchers on non lethal livestock protection tools and gives presentations throughout the state on coexisting with coyotes.
Keli lives with her husband Dean on the Bar CR Cattle Ranch in Petaluma, where Dean has
run the cow/calf operation for over 20 years.
3:30 PM
Ballroom South
Avian Lecture
Food as Enrichment
Not only does food provide essential nutrition to our songbird patients, but the variety of foods and presentation of food offers enrichment and skill building opportunities to prepare our patients for post-release success. We will discuss appropriate wild and cultivated foods for species groups, food presentation techniques for supporting skill development and enrichment, how to care for insects, and much more.
Veronica Bowers
Native Songbird Care & Conservation
Veronica Bowers is the director and founder of Native Songbird Care and Conservation. Located in Sebastopol, California, NSCC is a state and federally permitted wildlife rehabilitation facility devoted exclusively to the care of native passerines. With support of a small team of 12 amazing volunteers, Native Songbird Care & Conservation cares for approximately 1,000 songbirds each year.

Veronica has a passion for songbirds and has been working exclusively with this diverse and challenging group of wildlife since 1999. In addition to the hands-on care of the birds, Veronica is responsible for managing the day-to-day center operations, including recruitment, training and management of volunteers; raising funds to cover hospital operating costs; and responding to approximately 3,500 calls annually from the public.

Veronica teaches songbird rehabilitation workshops and species-specific classes to rehabilitators throughout North America; presents educational outreach programs to community groups in California; and serves on the California Council of Wildlife Rehabilitators board of directors and CCWR Advocacy Committee.
3:30 PM
Los Osos North/South
Avian Lab Lecture
Avian Physical Exam - Lab Lecture
Note: Attending this lecture is a prerequisite to participate in the paid laboratory session. All registrants are welcome to attend the lecture.
Lecture Summary: As mammals we all largely understand quite a bit about mammalian anatomy. But birds are another beast entirely! Drastically different and variable anatomy coupled with often small body sizes can make our fingers feel like sausages and make it very confusing to figure out what is wrong with an injured bird. In this lecture and lab we will show you how to do an effective avian physical exam, and identify all the parts while assessing what is and is not normal. Correctly identifying abnormalities is a crucial step in the treatment of all birds that come into care. Lab students will have ample opportunities to perform physical examinations of various species of birds (carcasses).
Dr. Rebecca Duerr
International Bird Rescue
Dr. Rebecca Duerr is the Veterinarian and Research Director at International Bird Rescue's two wildlife clinics in California. She completed her DVM, MPVM, and PhD degrees at University of California Davis, with the care of oiled seabirds as the subject of both graduate degrees. She is currently working on the second edition of Hand-Rearing Birds, recently wrote and co-edited NWRA's Topics in Wildlife Medicine, Vol. 4: Orthopedics, co-wrote the wild orphans section of Merck Veterinary Manual, and just finished Seabird Medicine and Orphan Care chapters for the upcoming book Medical Management of Wildlife Species: A Guide for Practitioners. She serves on the Board of Directors of the National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association and is a frequent lecturer at UC Davis on avian physiology and pediatrics.
4:30 PM
Ballroom North/Center
Avian Lab Lecture
Avian Wash Lab Lecture
Note: Attending this lecture is a prerequisite to attend the paid Avian Wash Laboratory. All registrants are welcome to the lecture.
Lecture Summary: Wildlife are exposed to many environmental contaminants, frequently caused by human activity, like uncovered oil pans, sticky glue traps, open grease bins and hanging fly traps in addition to oil spills. Once a bird becomes contaminated, their ability to fly and thermoregulate threatens their livelihood and survival. Knowing when and how to remove contaminates is essential for successfully rehabilitating your patient. This presentation focuses on stabilization, building, and equipment requirements for washing avian patients. Principles for safely removing contaminants from feathers and stress reduction techniques for each treatment will be covered.
January Bill
Bird Ally X
Vann Masvidal, Marie Travers, Shannon Riggs, DVM, Monte Merrick, Laura Corsiglia & January O. Bill are cofounders of Bird Ally X(BAX). BAX is a small nonprofit organization dedicated to helping wild birds and the people who care for them. They have been working together for over 11 years, specializing in aquatic bird rehabilitation and contaminated wildlife. They are co-authors of An Introduction to Aquatic Bird Rehabilitation.

Vann Masvidal: BAX Co-founder, Pacific Wildlife Clinic Director & Volunteer Coordinator, CCWR Board of Directors President
Marie Travers: BAX Co-founder, Focus Wildlife, CCWR Publications Committee Member
Shannon Riggs: BAX Co-founder, Pacific Wildlife Care Director of Animal Care, Wildlife Veterinarian, CCWR Board of Directors Member At Large
Monte Merrick: BAX Co-Founder, Humboldt Wildlife Care Center Director,
Laura Corsiglia: BAX Co-founder, Visual Artist
January Bill: BAX Co-founder, CCWR Advocacy Committee Member
4:30 PM
Ballroom South
Avian Lecture
Terrible Towhees
In this lecture, we provide an overview of the towhee protocol used at the Bird Rescue Center (www.birdrescuecenter.org). First, we review the reasons why towhees are such a challenge to rehabbers (i.e., trauma, susceptibility to captivity-induced stress, reluctance to gape). Second, the lecture will outline towhee's natural environment in the wild: where they live, what they eat, how they behave at different stages of development, and how they communicate. Next, we will share with you the lessons we have learned over the years about how to care for towhees, highlighting the key factors for success. Finally, we will describe our towhee-specific method for soft release and provide our recommendations for easing the transition from rehab (captivity) to independence (surviving and thriving in the wild).
Ashton Kluttz
The Bird Rescue Center
Ashton Kluttz is the Director of Avian Care at the Bird Rescue Center (BRC, Santa Rosa, CA). She completed her B.A. in Environmental Studies at Washington College (Chestertown, MD), and is currently in the process of completing her certification as a registered veterinary technician. She began her career as a wildlife rehabber at the Marine Mammal Center, where she served as a Stranding Intern (i.e., rescue and triage response). From 2009-2013 she worked at the Bird Rescue Center as a Shift Supervisor and took a position as veterinary assistant during 2012-2013. In the fall of 2013, she returned to BRC as Manager of the Rehabilitation Hospital, and later Director of Avian Care. Under her direction and with consultation from other organizations, BRC dramatically improved the release rates for difficult species such as towhees and house finches.
4:30 PM
Los Osos North/South
Avian Lecture
Avian Pain Management
The goals of this lecture are to familiarize the rehabilitator with the conditions requiring pain management, and the most common drugs used to treat these painful conditions.
Dr. Michelle Hawkins
CA Raptor Center
Dr. Hawkins received her veterinary degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997 and completed a residency and fellowship in Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery at the University of California, Davis in 2001. She became board-certified in Avian Practice by the American Board of Veterinary Practice in 2002. After 2 years in private practice, she joined the faculty of the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine faculty. She is currently Professor of Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis and Director of the California Raptor Center. Her research focuses on anesthesia, analgesia and critical patient care for companion and wild birds.
6:30 PM
Foyer
 
Networking Reception
Join CCWR for an free appetizer buffet. A no-host beer and wine bar will also be available.
CCWR

7:00 PM
Del Monte
General Information Meeting
Advocacy Committee Meeting
CCWR